Blueprint FAQ

  1. What are Health Service Providers supposed to do with the Blueprint?
  2. What is the role of Health Service Providers? Where do we start?
  3. How will this model improve health care in the North West LHIN?
  4. What are the benefits of system integration?
  5. What types of services will be provided at the local level?
  6. What types of services will be provided at the District level?
  7. What types of services will be provided regionally in the LHIN?
  8. How do the local, district and regional levels fit together?
  9. How will the governance structure work?
  10. How do First Nations fit into the proposed governance structures?
  11. What is the role for Public Health in this model?
  12. How do we get non-LHIN funded providers involved in the transformation?
  13. Why should I care about the Blueprint?

 

 

1. What are Health Service Providers supposed to do with the Blueprint?

  • Leadership is critical to the health and wellbeing of the people of Northwestern Ontario.
  • This is a great opportunity to be involved in an exciting transformation of our health care system. Our actions today will mean better access to care and healthier people in the future.

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2. What is the role of Health Service Providers? Where do we start?

The North West LHIN can’t do it alone. We need health service providers to: 

  • Embrace change - be proud to be a change agent in their community;
  • Take responsibility to help lead the implementation of the North West LHIN Health Services Blueprint in their community;
  • Understand, socialize and champion the North West LHIN Health Services Blueprint and its recommendations, including integration initiatives/activities;
  • Identify other Blueprint Champions, and work with them to prepare respective organizations and communities for new ways of working; develop synergistic partnerships; share best practices, identify opportunities for change;
  • Advocate and lead the required change not only within their own organization, but across organizations and in your community; and
  • Not to be afraid to ask for help and guidance as we move together through this exciting time of transformation.

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3. How will this model improve health care in the North West LHIN?

  • Improvement will come through integration.
  • Integration should not be scary. There are different types of integration that fit along a continuum, including: 
    • Coordination and cooperation of of multiple providers coordinating activities, often focused on process improvements and improved client experience. e.g. Home First;
    • Joint initiatives with a formalized partnership agreement/memorandum of understanding committing resources to achieve agreed outcomes e.g. Nurse-Led Outreach;
    • Back office integrations to enable partners to share resources to deliver a common function across multiple organizations such as finance, HR, IT, laundry services;
    • Clinical integrations focus on improvements to the client experience through consistent, quality, evidence-based care. Examples include hub and spoke models where one provider develops a program that is delivered in multiple locations; and
    • Mergers of multiple providers to create a new organization with a new Board of Directors. Includes amalgamation of fiscal, clinical and HR under a single governance structure.

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4. What are the benefits of system integration?

  • Many. Consider:
    • System sustainability
    • Better coordination of people and services
    • Better decision-making by everybody, at every level
    • Improved access to care
    • Improved quality of care
    • Lower wait times
    • Fewer visits to the emergency department
    • Healthier people
    • Less duplication of services
    • Improved organizational efficiency
  • Integration means your mother, your son, your friends and neighbours, will get the right care, in the right place, at the right time – by the right level of specialization and at the right cost.

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5. What types of services will be provided at the local level?

  • At the local level, Local Health Hubs will plan and provide health care services to the local community with a focus on improved access to care for stable patients, including those with chronic conditions and mental health and addictions issues.
  • Services at the local level will include:
    • Primary care, community support services, community mental health and addictions, acute care, post-acute care (rehab, complex continuing care, transitional care), and long-term care.

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6. What types of services will be provided at the District level?

  • One hospital in each District will be designated the District Health Campus.
  • The District Health Campus will provide more specialized, secondary care to the population through the District Hospital site, as well as through visiting clinics in local health hubs and technology-based services (e.g. telemedicine, tele-psychiatry).
  • The District Health Campus is expected to host a Community Care Access Centre satellite office and may host some regional programming.
  • At the district level there will also be an Integrated District Network.
  • Integrated District Networks, or IDNs, are formalized networks, made up of all LHIN-funded HSPs that deliver health services within the District.
  • The role of the IDN is to arrange the provision of a coordinated continuum of services to the population within the District
  • The IDN will also coordinate links to regional programs.
  • The Integrated District Network doesn’t provide “services.”
  • Within the North West LHIN, there will be five Integrated District Networks (City of Thunder Bay IDN, District of Thunder Bay IDN, Kenora IDN, Rainy River IDN, Northern IDN).

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7. What types of services will be provided regionally in the LHIN?

  • Regional programs will focus on high cost, high complexity, high impact services.
  • Regional programs will enable the provision of highly specialized care within the North West LHIN.
  • Examples of existing specialized regional programs and services are the angioplasty and cancer programs we have in Northwestern Ontario with leading practice teams.
  • Within regional programs, some services are delivered at the local level, with more specialized services available at a District or Regional level.
  • Regional programs will also include components of education, research, knowledge exchange, adoption of evidence-based practice and system navigation.
  • Regional or LHIN-wide programs and services will ensure care is based on evidence and leading practice and will set the standards of care across the LHIN.
  • It is expected regional programs will be disease-based (e.g. cancer), population-based (e.g. seniors), or will enable delivery of key services across the LHIN (e.g. back office solutions).

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8. How do the local, district and regional levels fit together?

  • Local Health Hubs deliver primary care close to home.
  • Local Health Hubs will be part of the Integrated District Networks and will bring valuable information about local health care needs to the District table.
  • Local Health Hubs can make referrals to specialty programs at the District and Regional levels.
  • At the District level, there is one designated District Health Campus within each District.
  • The District Health Campus will provide more specialized care within the District.
  • The District Health Campus is part of the Integrated District Network.
  • The Network will act like a steering committee, overseeing the coordination of care across the District, facilitating the link with highly specialized regional programs.
  • In turn, the regional programs will work closely with and support the Districts to spread best practices and deliver specialty programs and services to all populations across the LHIN.

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9. How will the governance structure work?

  • The Blueprint does not include a recommendation on governance structure.
  • While the North West LHIN brought forward three conceptual options for discussion at recent Governance-to-Governance discussions, more planning and analysis will have to take place before an appropriate governance structure is identified.

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10. How do First Nations fit into the proposed governance structures?

  • Within our definition of governance, the North West LHIN includes those who provide leadership for their organization.
  • This includes Boards, Band Councils, CEOs, Chiefs and Health Directors depending on the provider and the community.

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11. What is the role for Public Health in this model?

  • Public Health is not a LHIN responsibility.
  • However, over time, LHIN-funded and non LHIN-funded organizations at the Local Health Hub level will be expected to work together to improve the coordination of health services across the continuum, which includes health wellness and prevention.

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12. How do we get non-LHIN funded providers involved in the transformation?

  • Initially the focus is on working with LHIN-funded providers.
  • But we welcome and encourage participation and collaboration from all sectors.
  • This could include other ministries, District Social Services Boards, Health Canada, community-based volunteer organizations and informal support networks.
  • Over time, we need providers to build valuable, lasting partnerships with all organizations that impact patient care.

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13. Why should I care about the Blueprint?

  • This is an opportunity for Health Service Providers to become part of a movement to create a health care system that provides better access to health care than ever before.
  • We need Health Care Providers to lead the transformation to a health care system for the future – not just for us, but for our children and grandchildren.
  • We, as health care providers, need to work together, to move from looking at a person as a client in one organization to envision a person-centered care model
  • The Blueprint represents system transformation – a whole new way of doing health care.
  • It’s about the community as a whole and an integrated system for everyone.
  • We all have to shift our thinking to a community-based, integrated leadership view.
  • This is exciting, it’s cutting edge and it’s absolutely necessary for health system sustainability.
  • This is our opportunity to shape our local system – together – to reflect international leading practice as we develop health care for the future.

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